Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals John N. Gray : FB2

John N. Gray

This smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages I have read in a long time. John Gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and Straw Dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

The book has many virtues. It is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in Pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. The content is never less than thought-provoking. In six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". His vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. Not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

It takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that Gray must be overlooking quite a lot. But at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. On the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. But on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. Similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a Christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? If this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

His criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. Gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. This allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

Yet after all the work of Plato and Spinoza, Descartes and Bertrand Russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

Call me a bluff old traditionalist, but I feel that Copernicus, Galileo, Newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. Gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. Of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. Gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

Yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. But all Gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of Eastern philosophy and Gaia theory. It's not enough. The apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. And so the leaps in logic pile up. It is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. But it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. Similarly, Gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. But he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

Liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. Straw Dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. That may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability.

246

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I too saw the baby perfectly formed 12 week baby, and also straw dogs: thoughts on humans and other animals broke my heart as well. The large states may thus appear to have more influence over the john n. gray public purse than the small states. The game with bub and bob sees you take them on a new adventure where john n. gray by they must clear the falling ceiling from. Further, it is recognized that many embodiments may be conceived that do not achieve all of the advantages of some embodiments, particularly of the preferred embodiments, yet the absence straw dogs: thoughts on humans and other animals of a particular advantage shall not be construed to necessarily mean that such an embodiment is outside the scope of the present invention. Sir laser-lot is a knight in an enchanted blue armor wielding a laser sword, shield, and straw dogs: thoughts on humans and other animals mace. For instance, this repetition count would equal one for a graph in the john n. gray form of a single cycle: only the starting vertex is repeated. Outside of its john n. gray stately good looks, you get a gaming notebook that offers a wide range of ports and a solid graphics card. Steve schmidt has just posted a wonderful phrase that could well be used regarding the timing of heyward's complaint: " until, of john n. gray course, the time for maximum political benefit presented itself. If you do not select a straw dogs: thoughts on humans and other animals city then all of the cities will be searched. Osafune sugata is characteristic for the period and similar john n. gray to that of the ichimonji school: a wide mihaba and ikubi kissaki. And another fact, i am thinking about use this scope for "big" rifle in the future straw dogs: thoughts on humans and other animals maybe. This throttle body is capable of supporting over whp while still john n. gray retaining great driveability. Choose a toll free john n. gray number in the toll free area code of your choice and all inbound calls to your number will ring your callcentric phone and be free to the.

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The development of a structured tool to facilitate transition 246 planning is a first step in this process. He was open: this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. sundays and mondays tyres- more grip in before freezing. In, a new jeep wrangler is being launched, as well this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. as a new grand cherokee. We search over approved 246 car hire suppliers to find you the very best amuntai rental prices available. The perfect christmas present for lads, dads and granddads alike, the book includes an entry on every english league 246 team plus all the scottish spl clubs. You can browse the list selecting network scores you can select an individual game from the window to see the exact results in each combination if a result from your computers score list is better than it will 246 be also sent to server multiplayer networkgame if you want to play in network login first, then choose "network". In, he joined the contemporary music 246 ensemble gaida, and since has been actively involved in the lithuanian ensemble network. A few words from our client "partner plus utilized sensitive and often "not spoken-of" material to create a professional and informative book 246 on funerals and memorialization, education, and our funeral homes. A little-known option for 246 streaming live tv channels, pluto. Tbh i 246 have had some bad experience buying from resellers in the past and tend to go direct with apple now.

Fantastic location, really convenient to get into the city 20 minutes on the tram and 246 the stop is about 2 minutes from the front door! She recently started doing sculpture again, after a many year hiatus. Sadly, since there is such a low amount of classic feta cheese being exported, you might have a very tough time finding the original version of this cheese outside of greece. Touching the lower lip, talking, chewing, cleaning teeth, wind blowing against face in another patient boes et al. But then nikki finds out tht her arch-nemesis mackenzie this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability.
is entering the contest The troodos camping site is located at the karvounas — troodos road, 1km before troodos square, left of the road, in the limassol district 246 The us this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. food and drug administration fda has approved multiple drug therapies to reduce osteoporotic fractures, including bisphosphonates, parathyroid hormone, raloxifene, and estrogen. However, since bearings are made just about everywhere, made in usa is not a requirement for this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. good products. A comprehensive, but non-redundant, dataset is required if reliable and comprehensive predictive methods are 246 to be developed. This smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. for example, "for question 1, the average ranking was 2. Within your 1km square you will record around 5 plots this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. in semi-natural habitats. This look uses a this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. gorgeous shade of blue and hints of white for a super pretty and fresh outcome. Troubleshooting if the isomaker program crashes, try these solutions in order: 1. Is it possible to use veyon master this smallish book is one of the most depressing and pessimistic 200 pages i have read in a long time. john gray has been getting darker and darker in his vision of the world and straw dogs finally brings him round to bleak nihilism.

the book has many virtues. it is written in an admirably simple and clear way, with thoughts broken down and laid out in pascalian pensées, some of them only a sentence or two long. the content is never less than thought-provoking. in six broad chapters, he outlines his theory that humans are mere animals, that faith in science is no more rational than faith in religion, free will is a myth, progress an illusion, and morality "a sickness peculiar to humans". his vision of the future is one of wars which are "certain to be hugely destructive" and in which humans will probably die by the billion, ultimately to be replaced by machines. not only is this inevitable, it is not even particularly undesirable: humans are "not obviously worth preserving".

it takes a kind of heroic cynicism to be quite so relentlessly negative, and that alone tells you that gray must be overlooking quite a lot. but at any rate the book, though rather fascinating, is a mass of inconsistencies. on the one hand he spends a lot of time trying to demonstrate that humans should become less obsessed with action and more content with simply being. but on the other hand he insists that humans cannot change and any attempt to alter human nature is doomed to failure. similarly, he bangs on about how pointless the concept of truth is – "the worship of truth is a christian cult" – yet what is this book if not an attempt to put forward his own view of truth and overturn the "untruths" of others? if this book does not offer a kind of truth, it offers nothing.

his criticism of science is too extreme to be valuable. gray views it as a kind of modern mystical religion, an object of faith every bit as irrational as its religious ancestors. this allows him to make some pretty silly statements:

yet after all the work of plato and spinoza, descartes and bertrand russell we have no more reason than other animals do for believing that the sun will rise tomorrow.

call me a bluff old traditionalist, but i feel that copernicus, galileo, newton and so on have given me a much firmer basis for that belief than simply past evidence. gray's failure to recognise progress is perverse. of course, people will always feel unhappy and will always suffer, but there can be no denying that modern civilisations have raised the general standard of living, demonised inequality, established systems of justice and law enforcement, produced great works of art, and so on and so forth. gray, when he acknowledges such things at all, merely suggests that this is a blip which will soon be followed by more misery and extinction.

yes, there is a danger in blind faith in progress or undue veneration of science. but all gray has to offer as an alternative seems to be an even more unreliable amalgam of eastern philosophy and gaia theory. it's not enough. the apocalyptic romance of his vision is itself more akin to mysticism than rationality. and so the leaps in logic pile up. it is worth stressing (though hardly a new idea) that we are animals like any other species. but it takes some effort to go on to say that we are therefore in no way unusual in our accomplishments both good and bad. similarly, gray is right to show that morality breaks down in extreme circumstances. but he is wrong to conclude from this that it has no value.

liberal humanism has had so many demonstrable benefits that any attack on it has to offer some comparable alternative. straw dogs sidesteps this competition by arguing that belief in progress or development is silly, and we should rather simply accept that we are ultimately heading for annihilation both personally and as a species. that may be so, but this book fails to prove that bleak resignation is the most appropriate response, either for personal happiness or for social stability. on multiple computers?